Farming

Germany, the country of engineering ingenuity and industry, has always at the same time remained a country with a strong agricultural sector. Despite a high population density, half of the national territory is put to agricultural use. Around a million people produce goods worth around 50 billion Euro a year in approx. 270,000 agricultural enterprises. Farmers provide us with high-quality foodstuffs. They are also providing a growing contribution to energy and raw materials supplies. They shape and maintain the face of our country.

Germany's agricultural sector is among the four largest producers in the European Union. In order to feed the more than 200 million farm animals, around 50 percent of farmland is made up of grassland and arable land that is used for feeding purposes. For human consumption, the main production areas of the farming sector include, besides animal products, bread cereals, potatoes, sugar beet, oilseeds, fruit and vegetables. In addition, there are grassland and crop areas dedicated to the production of bioenergy and bio-resources.

The BMEL sees itself as a driver in the dialogue with social groups on the future of our agricultural sector. In view of scarce resources, the growing world population, with its rising food and energy requirements, represents both a challenge and opportunity for our farmers. It obliges them to pursue sustainable growth. Beyond that, modern farming caters for consumer wishes, handles the environment with care, sets store by animal welfare and constitutes a backbone of our rural regions.

A woman and a man are standing next to a tractor on a grainfield
© curto - stock.adobe.com

Overview of topics

Plant pro­duc­tion

Plant production is at the beginning of the agricultural value chain. The regulations on good agricultural practice make an important contribution to ensuring sustainable production. Plant production in Germany is diverse, ranging from arable farming, horticulture and fruit growing to the cultivation of wine and hops.

More

EU agri­cul­tur­al pol­i­cy + sup­port

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) has been one of the most important areas of European policy since the unification of Europe.

More

Or­gan­ic farm­ing

With annual sales revenues of Euro 11.97  billion (2019) Germany has the largest organic food market in Europe. The Bio-Siegel (German organic production logo) creates transparency and offers reliable orientation in the jungle of organic brands. Organic products are subject to controls on the basis not only of food and feed legislation but also of the EU legal provisions for organic farming.

More

Cli­mate stew­ard­ship

Germany aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 55 percent at least by 2030. The Federal Government has initiated a Climate Change Act for this purpose. The Act aims at a reduction of annual emissions in the agricultural sector of from 11 to 14 million tons CO² equivalents by 2030 compared with the levels of 2014. The Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) has developed a package of measures designed to ensure that this target is achieved.

More

Species di­ver­si­ty

The conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity in agriculture, forestry, fisheries and the food industry form the basis of life for us and for future generations.

More

So­cial pol­i­cy in agri­cul­ture

Agricultural social security policy is a creative, target-oriented policy for the benefit of active farmers and their families which helps to establish the conditions for developing an efficient and competitive agricultural sector.

More

Bioe­con­o­my and re­new­able re­sources

Bioeconomy is considered as one of the most important future fields for sustainable economic activity. The BMEL is promoting the transition in industry and society toward a sustainable and bio-based economy. The industrial use of renewable resources is gathering speed around the world and in Germany in particular and is tapping into new markets.

More

Green ge­net­ic en­gi­neer­ing

The use of genetic methods for agriculture is called “green genetic engineering”. Genetic engineering is part of biotechnology, which is a generic term for an extremely large number of processes, products and methods.

More

Green pro­fes­sions

The 14 "green professions" are versatile, technically demanding and nature-related professions in the agricultural and food sector: working with people, animals and plants, producing food such as milk, wine, honey or meat, operating state-of-the-art digitally supported technology, using laboratory know-how to ensure the quality of agricultural products or protecting our forests - the "green professions" offer a wide range of professional activities to choose from.

More

Recommendations

Joint Task for the "Im­prove­ment of Agri­cul­tur­al Struc­tures and Coastal Pro­tec­tion" (topic:eu-agricultural-policy)

The Federal Government and the Länder jointly promote rural areas, agriculture and coastal protection.

More

Pub­li­ca­tions of the Ad­vi­so­ry Board on Bio­di­ver­si­ty and Ge­net­ic Re­sources (topic:agriculture)

The Advisory Board is an interdisciplinary body which is to assist in further developing consumer policies. The independent body works in an honorary capacity and draws up scientific opinions and statements.

More

Dig­i­tal­i­sa­tion in agri­cul­ture (topic:digitalisation)

The biggest gains from digitalisation in agriculture are expected to come from potentially making productivity more sustainable and from reductions in working hours and workload. This will result in reductions in the use of fertilisers, plant protection products and energy and improvements in animal welfare.

More

Eight dig­i­tal tri­al fields launched (topic:digitalisation)

On Wednesday at the International Green Week in Berlin, Minister of Agriculture Julia Klöckner confirmed the funding of two more digital trial fields on agricultural holdings and in rural areas. The Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) has earmarked funds of more than EUR 50 million over the next three years.

More

The BMEL’s “Re­new­able Re­sources” Fund­ing Pro­gramme (topic:bioeconomy)

The redesigned Renewable Resources Funding Programme provides the basis for the continuation of the successful support provided by the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) in the area of renewable resources. The programme currently receives aorund 85 million euros from the federal budget.

More

Ques­tions and An­swers on the Com­mon Eu­ro­pean Agri­cul­tur­al Pol­i­cy (CAP) (topic:eu-agricultural-policy)

The CAP has been one of the most important areas of European policy since the inception of European integration. The CAP has been repeatedly adjusted to take account of changes in living conditions in Europe.

More

Na­tion­al Bioe­con­o­my Strat­e­gy (topic:bioeconomy)

Bioeconomy is considered as one of the most important future fields for sustainable economic activity. With the National Bioeconomy Strategy, the Federal Government is promoting the transition in industry and society toward a sustainable and bio-based economy.

More

Agri­cul­ture and cli­mate change mit­i­ga­tion (topic:climate-stewardship)

Germany aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 55 percent at least by 2030. The Federal Government has initiated a Climate Change Act for this purpose. The Act aims at a reduction of annual emissions in the agricultural sector of from 11 to 14 million tons CO² equivalents by 2030 compared with the levels of 2014. The Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) has developed a package of measures designed to ensure that this target is achieved.

More

In­ter­na­tion­al Congress on Sheep and Goats (topic:species-diversity)

Sheep and goats are among the oldest livestock animals due to their diverse uses. With much passion and diligence people have dedicated themselves to the breeding and keeping of various sheep and goat breeds. These livestock keepers provide an important contribution to a sustainable agriculture and to the conservation of biodiversity.

More

Bio­di­ver­si­ty Pro­tect­ing bees and in­sects (topic:species-diversity)

Both natural biodiversity and so-called agrobiodiversity, i.e. biodiversity created and used by humankind, are in decline. This development is evident all over the world – including in Germany. Protecting and maintaining species diversity and biological diversity are key future challenges.

More

Use of cookies

Cookies help us to provide our services. By using our website you agree that we can use cookies. Read more on data protection and visit the following link: Data protection

OK